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Mathematics - 27.09.2023
Wing-screen wipers: How self-cleaning cicadas could help us have cleaner cars
Self-cleaning cicadas could help design new tech which will make our cars cleaner, scientists say. A type of large insect known as a cicada is able to keep its wings clean of dust and dirt through a remarkable process which could be applied in modern technology. The texture of the cicada wing is unusually repellent to water - known as being "super hydrophobic".

Mathematics - 19.09.2023
Machine learning models can produce reliable results even with limited training data
Researchers have determined how to build reliable machine learning models that can understand complex equations in real-world situations while using far less training data than is normally expected.

Computer Science - Mathematics - 18.09.2023
Multi-AI collaboration helps reasoning and factual accuracy in large language models
Researchers use multiple AI models to collaborate, debate, and improve their reasoning abilities to advance the performance of LLMs while increasing accountability and factual accuracy. An age-old adage, often introduced to us during our formative years, is designed to nudge us beyond our self-centered, nascent minds: "Two heads are better than one." This proverb encourages collaborative thinking and highlights the potency of shared intellect.

Computer Science - Mathematics - 12.09.2023
AI model speeds up high-resolution computer vision
AI model speeds up high-resolution computer vision
The system could improve image quality in video streaming or help autonomous vehicles identify road hazards in real-time. An autonomous vehicle must rapidly and accurately recognize objects that it encounters, from an idling delivery truck parked at the corner to a cyclist whizzing toward an approaching intersection.

Life Sciences - Mathematics - 08.09.2023
What do neurons, fireflies and dancing the Nutbush have in common?
Synchronicity is all around us, but it is poorly understood. Computer scientists have now developed new tools to understand how human and natural networks fall in and out of sync. Computer scientists and mathematicians working in complex systems at the University of Sydney and the Max Planck Institute for Mathematics in the Sciences in Germany have developed new methods to describe what many of us take for granted - how easy, or hard, it can be to fall in and out of sync.

Mathematics - 18.08.2023
Mathematics against Weeds
Mathematics against Weeds
Together with the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Würzburg biology professor Chaitanya S. Gokhale has developed a mathematical model on population dynamics and evolution of herbicide resistance in perennial weeds. Weeds have always been a significant problem for agriculture. They compete with crops for resources such as light, water and nutrients, which can result in severe yield losses.

Mathematics - 17.08.2023
Are you breaking your body clock?
Researchers use mathematical models to better understand how the body regulates circadian rhythms Researchers are using mathematical models to better understand the effects of disruptions like daylight savings time, working night shifts, jet lag or even late-night phone scrolling on the body's circadian rhythms.

Mathematics - Computer Science - 27.07.2023
The race for the Kochen-Specker Theorem
The race for the Kochen-Specker Theorem
A world record in solving satisfiability problems was achieved at the Vienna University of Technology - it is quite abstract, but the technology behind it is extremely important for hardware and software industries . Suppose Alice, Bob, and Carla answer a question. Each of the three answers is either correct or incorrect.

Physics - Mathematics - 04.07.2023
The vampire einstein
Researchers discover a single shape that tiles the plane aperiodically without reflection By Joe Petrik Cheriton School of Computer Science Just months ago, an international team of four that includes Cheriton School of Computer Science Craig Kaplan discovered a single shape that tiles the plane - an infinite, two-dimensional surface - in a pattern that can never be made to repeat.

Life Sciences - Mathematics - 27.06.2023
Vision allows brain to make predictions well before it knows what's coming
Vision allows brain to make predictions well before it knows what’s coming
Vision allows brain to make predictions well before it knows what's coming, new study shows Blending math and AI, Western researchers developed neural network model able to predict individual moments in the future The moment a pitcher unleashes a fastball in the direction of Toronto Blue Jays shortstop Bo Bichette in a professional baseball game, the crowd at Rogers Centre hopes something special is about to happen.

Computer Science - Mathematics - 26.06.2023
Ninth Dedekind number discovered: Scientists from Paderborn and Leuven solve long-known problem in mathematics
Ninth Dedekind number discovered: Scientists from Paderborn and Leuven solve long-known problem in mathematics
Making history with 42 digits: Scientists at Paderborn University and KU Leuven have unlocked a decades-old mystery of mathematics with the so-called ninth Dedekind number. Experts worldwide have been searching for the value since 1991. The Paderborn scientists arrived at the exact sequence of numbers with the help of the Noctua supercomputer located there.

Life Sciences - Mathematics - 05.06.2023
'Butterfly chaos effect' discovered in swarms and herds of animals
’Butterfly chaos effect’ discovered in swarms and herds of animals
Researchers at the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) and the Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM) have discovered a phase shift between chaotic states that can appear in herds of animals and, in particular, in swarms of insects. This advance may help to better understand their behaviour or be applied to the study of the movement of cells or tumours.

Mathematics - 01.06.2023
Turning a circle into a square is possible with this kirigami-inspired formula
Turning a circle into a square is possible with this kirigami-inspired formula
A study inspired by the Japanese paper-cutting art provides a blueprint for designing shape-shifting materials and devices. Kirigami takes pop-up books to a whole new level. The Japanese paper craft involves cutting patterns in paper to transform a two-dimensional sheet into an intricate, three-dimensional structure when partially folded.

Computer Science - Mathematics - 26.05.2023
'For very small problem sizes a classical computer is faster'
’For very small problem sizes a classical computer is faster’
In theory, quantum computers vastly outperform classical computers in terms of computing speed. For them to do so in practice, it is necessary to design more and novel high-speed algorithms, says ETH supercomputing specialist Torsten Hoefler. Quantum computers promise to be capable of solving some computational problems much faster than classical computers.

Computer Science - Mathematics - 25.05.2023
Probabilistic AI that knows how well it’s working
It's more important than ever for artificial intelligence to estimate how accurately it is explaining data. Despite their enormous size and power, today's artificial intelligence systems routinely fail to distinguish between hallucination and reality. Autonomous driving systems can fail to perceive pedestrians and emergency vehicles right in front of them, with fatal consequences.

Life Sciences - Mathematics - 02.05.2023
Revealing how an embryo's cells sync up
Revealing how an embryo’s cells sync up
Scientists have known that when a mouse embryo is developing, the cells that will become its spine and muscles switch specific genes on and off repeatedly, in a synchronous fashion. However, there are deep mysteries about how these cells synchronize. FMI researchers have now developed a mathematical model that not only better explains how spontaneous synchronization arises in a developing mouse embryo, but may also offer some fundamental clues about how other biological systems sync up.

Mathematics - 27.04.2023
How to untangle a worm ball: Mathematicians solve a knotty mystery
How to untangle a worm ball: Mathematicians solve a knotty mystery
California blackworms tangle themselves up by the thousands, then separate in a split second. Their trick may inspire the design of self-detangling materials and fibers. As anyone who has ever unwound a string of holiday lights or detangled a lock of snarled hair knows, undoing a knot of fibers takes a lot longer than tangling it up in the first place.

Mathematics - Physics - 14.04.2023
'Learning from one another means we arrive at findings faster'
’Learning from one another means we arrive at findings faster’
Hendrik Weber and Raimar Wulkenhaar from the -Mathematics Münster- Cluster of Excellence work together on mathematical solutions Excellent research is not possible without interdisciplinary working. But, even within one discipline, collaborations crossing the barriers between research areas can lead to new approaches and findings.

Computer Science - Mathematics - 13.04.2023
A trick of the hat
April 13, 2023 The story of how a Waterloo computer science professor helped find the elusive einstein tile By Joe Petrik Cheriton School of Computer Science A nearly 60-year-old mathematical problem has finally been solved. The story began last fall when David Smith, a retired print technician from Yorkshire, England, came upon a shape with a tantalizing property.

Mathematics - 06.04.2023
Turbulent affairs: Scientists enhance the simulation of strong flow phenomena
Turbulent affairs: Scientists enhance the simulation of strong flow phenomena
It doesn't have to be a hurricane or a tsunami - even a simple running water tap induces a shock wave upon impact with the sink. Now, with the help of CSCS's supercomputer "Piz Daint", mathematician Siddhartha Mishra of ETH Zürich is working to overcome current barriers to simulating and comprehending highly turbulent flows.